Sick? Injured? – Get flexible with your race goals

So all the hard work has been done. That race, be it a marathon or a half marathon that has had you training religiously for the last 4-5 months will be upon you in a matter of days. There’s just one snag – somehow you’ve managed to pick up a little niggling injury or a bad cold or sickness bug!

Some would say this is ‘sod’s law’, but actually it is all too common. The risks of pushing ourselves into training too hard and long, or perhaps more appropriately – not training wisely, is that we can push ourselves into an ‘overtraining’ scenario and our body gradually begins to breakdown. This is why it is so important to listen to your body. When you are fatigued it is difficult to go out a run a good quality hard training session, be it a tempo run or speed repeats, etc that we will actually benefit from. Just to be clear on this point – our body’s improve from overstressing ourselves and then recovering. It is in the ‘recovery’ stage that we actually improve and why more often that not, the day after a hard workout should be spent resting or perhaps with an easy ‘recovery’ run. If we don’t do this, there is only so much our already overworked and fatigued muscles and tendons, heart, etc can take before something has to give.

The other common problem is that too many runners actually get sick during their taper just before a race. This is usually because as the physical questions we ask of our bodies (ie; gradually less and less), our body may be tempted to think that is suddenly now taking a vacation and stop fighting as hard as it has become accustomed to. Place yourself in a room full of people with germs, colds, etc and your immune system is a little ran down, then there is potential to be more susceptible to get sick.

This doesn’t mean we have to avoid everyone of course. Just continue to rest up, eat healthily and well, try to avoid stressful situations as much as possible (stress can also have great negative effects on our body’s immune systems) and generally look after yourself. Some may choose to take some supplementary vitamins pills for example and this may well help, but eating well is just as important as all the nutrients you’ll need can be obtained naturally.

So race day is here and you now have a nasty cold. Should you still run?

This is very much a personal thing, but the general rule of thumb is if the affected cold area is above the neck, then it’s OK still. If, however, you have a cough and are having some respiratory issues, then you should definitely consider postponing the race and maybe considering a different upcoming race. The same goes for if you actually have flu and are feeling achy, etc. It can actually be very dangerous to place too much stress on your body if you are suffering this way and if you ask too much of yourself, it is possible to inflict far worse damage on yourself that can potentially take weeks and months to fully recover from.

Assuming you feel as if you should still run though, you need to be realistic. The chances of you hitting that PB you were aiming for are probably very slim and in this authors experience, the longer and harder the race (such as a marathon, which is already taxing enough on the body), the higher the chances you will begin to suffer more than usual, probably sooner and harder than usual as well. Therefore you should consider adjusting your target. Perhaps just aim to run round the course and try to enjoy it, forget about the time on this occasion. At the very least, allow yourself to back off from your original timing. You never know, you may actually feel better than you thought later in the race and be able to kick on a bit and you’ll also recover a lot quicker if you don’t tax your body quite so hard – Bear in mind that if racing with a sickness, your body will probably suffer a lot more stress, maybe causing you to sweat more than usual or even dehydrate a lot quicker amongst other concerns- so LISTEN TO YOUR BODY and be prepared to adapt!

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